Program Details

Download a Registration Brochure

Breakout Session Content Strands:

  • Strand A: Strength-Based Approaches 

  • Strand B: Integrated Healthcare

  • Strand C: Community Inclusion

  • Strand D: Social Policy

  • Strand E: Crisis Response

Monday, May 7

8:30 am - 9:00 am | Welcome & Opening Remarks

Linda Bimbo, MA, Director, UNH Institute on Disability; Mike Ferrara, PhD, Dean, UNH College of Health and Human Services; Kent P. Falb Professor of Kinesiology, UNH

9:00 am - 10:15 am | Keynote

30 Years of START
Joan Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services; Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire; Dan Tomasulo, PhD, MFA, MAPP, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education, Columbia University, Teachers College; Assistant Instructor for Martin Seligman, Masters of Applied Positive Psychology, University of Pennsylvania

This keynote will explore 30 years of START development through the use of case examples, research outcomes, and a national perspective of lessons learned from across the U.S. CE credit is not offered for this session.

Participants will be able to:

  • Provide an overview of  the START model and the evolution of  START practices over a 30 year span
  • Discuss data collection and analysis and how it informs us
  • Explain the value of collaboration with partners and how this contributes to effective capacity building

10:30 am - 12:00 pm | Panel

Evidence Based Medicine: What Do We Really Know about Treating People with IDD and Behavioral Health Challenges?
Lauren R Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Co-Chair of the START National Research Committee; National Consultant & Trainer, Center for START Services; Jarrett Barnhill, MD, DFAPA, FAACAP, Medical Director, Center for START Services; Robert Baldor, MD, Senior Vice Chair, Family Medicine & Community Health, UMass Memorial Medical Center; Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School; Jennifer L McLaren, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center; Medical Director, NH START; Adam Kaul, MD, Medical Director, Virginia START, Medical Director, Good Neighbor Community Services.

The panel will discuss the state of the art with respect to the care of people with IDD who have significant behavioral health challenges from multiple perspectives including Neuropsychiatry, Primary Care, Child Psychiatry and Developmental Psychology perspectives. Each panel member will present the strengths and pitfalls of relying on an existing but limited evidence base and discuss where we need to fill in the gaps. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current evidence base for use of antipsychotic drugs to treat challenging behaviors in people with IDD.
  • List at least 2 topics for future research that includes people with IDD that could improve our evidence base for assessment and treatment of individuals with IDD and behavioral health needs.
  • Identify the advantages of longitudinal research in clarifying pathways to mental illness that can inform more effective primary level interventions.

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm | Breakout Session 1

Strand A | Adaptive Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Christina Dupuch, MSW, Chief Operating Officer, Vaya Health

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) assumes that many of the problems exhibited by individuals are caused by skills deficits. In particular, the failure to use effective behavior when it is needed is often a result of not knowing skillful behavior or when or how to use it. For example, deficits in learning how to be present in the moment, interact appropriately in relationships, regulate emotions and tolerate distress are believed to be core challenges individual’s experience.  Therefore, a key focus for DBT is to improve the individual’s ability to use skillful behavior when needed, with a particular focus on learning effective emotion regulation strategies. The session will provide a foundational understanding of DBT and its value for individuals with IDD and/or co-occurring disorders. The intent of the session is to have participants understand DBT and transfer the DBT adaptions to individuals served. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the foundations of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and the positive relationship with co-occurring disorders (IDD/BH)
  • Explain the benefits of using the adaptations of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modules and Skills for people with IDD/BH
  • Demonstrate utilizing Dialectical Behavior Skills within various environments

Strand B | Emergency Department Evaluation of the Patient with IDD and Behavioral Challenges: A Bio-Psycho-Social Approach
Lauren R Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Co-Chair of the START National Research Committee; National Consultant & Trainer, Center for START Services; Robert Baldor, MD, Senior Vice Chair, Family Medicine & Community Health, UMass Memorial Medical Center; Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School; Adam Kaul, MD, Medical Director, Virginia START, Medical Director, Good Neighbor Community Services.

In this presentation, a set of suggested work-ups and considerations for a comprehensive emergency department evaluation of a person with IDD who presents with aggressive and other challenging behaviors without a known cause, is reviewed.  The approach to the patient will be addressed using case examples. Strategies for addressing agitation in this setting, while working towards a complete evaluation that includes assessment of common causes of distress induced agitated behaviors, will be presented. Our suggested guidelines for use of psychoactive medications in this setting will also be discussed. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. 

Participants will be able to:

  • List at least 3 of the most common missed medical problems that may contribute to a person with IDD and challenging behavior requiring an emergency department evaluation.
  • Describe 3 things that can be done to help reduce agitated behaviors in the setting of an emergency department evaluation of a person with IDD and challenging behaviors, other than use of medications.
  • Describe the way in which psychopharmacologic interventions should best be applied in the emergency department setting when a person is displaying aggressive behavior

Strand C | Cultural and Linguistic Competence: Implications for START (Part 1)
Tawara D. Goode, MA, Director, National Center for Cultural Competence, Director, University Center for  Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University  Medical Center; Respondent: Joan Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services; Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire

Cultural competence and linguistic competence are widely recognized as essential practices that promote quality and reduce disparities in health, behavioral health, and human services. While the evidence suggests their efficacy, many professionals and organizations continue to struggle to integrate cultural and linguistic competence into practice. This presentation will explore the multiple dimensions of culture, conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and linguistic competence, and their implications for the START program. This is a 2 part series geared toward program leadership. Registration for both sessions is required. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define culture, its multiple dimensions, and how they manifest in services and supports to individuals with intellectual disabilities and behavioral health needs and their families. 
  2. Describe conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and linguistic competence.
  3.  Apply these conceptual frameworks to the START Model and their respective roles.  

Strand D | Family-Professional Collaboration at The Heart of Effective START Services
Diane M.  Jacobstein, PhD, Clinical Psychologist/ Senior Policy Associate, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development/UCEDD;  Karla Chestnut, Parent and Family Advocate; Felicia Bates, MPH,  Clinical Team Leader, Iowa START

This presentation will highlight aspects of the effective partnership between providers and family members as demonstrated by an Iowa family receiving START services. Listening to the family’s ideas and needs and drawing upon their strengths is at the center of this effective collaborative relationship. The START Coordinator channels the family’s innate wisdom and recognizes their character strengths to ensure access to appropriate and accessible resources. This presentation will weave in tangible steps and tools that can be applied in other situations by professionals and family members. The perspective and voice of family members will be at the center of this session. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

 Participants will be able to:

  • List at least four ways a parent can provide expertise to the system
  • Describe how families can inform an integrated perspective that effects outcomes
  • Describe three ways a START coordinator can help elevate a family’s voice within a system of support

 Strand E |Crisis Evaluation and Response
Andrea Caoili, LCSW, Director of Quality Assurance, Center for START Services; Adjunct Professor, College of Health and Human Services, School Of Social Work, University of New Hampshire; Dave O’Neal, MS, LMHC, Project Facilitator ,Center for START Services; Director of IDD Services, Sound Mental Health

Individuals with IDD experience behavioral health crises and present with unique vulnerabilities and challenges when in interfacing with emergency safety net services. This presentation will provide an overview of issues, strategies and interventions for effective evaluation and response using case examples. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the challenges and vulnerabilities that present for individuals with IDD in emergency/crisis situations
  • Learn strategies to effectively collaborate with emergency service personnel
  • Apply interventions and evaluation techniques when assessing emergency needs of individuals with IDD and co-occurring behavioral health conditions.

3:15 pm – 4:45 pm | Breakout Session 2

Strand A | Stocking Your Wellness and Prevention Toolbox with Yoga
Karen Weigle, PhD, Associate Director, Center for START Services; Keith Beasley, E-RYT 200, Yoga Alliance

Yoga is not only a path to improved overall health and wellness, it is an effective tool in decreasing anxiety, improving mood, and improving focus. In this session, you will learn not only specific yoga strategies (including poses, breathing, and use of voice), but also how to adapt them to the individual(s) with whom you are working, taking into consideration physical abilities, trauma histories, and sensory needs. You will learn strategies to increase and decrease energy, and when to use which. These will be taught through practice, so wear clothes you can move in and be ready for fun! APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Adapt a yoga routine for people with various physical abilities and various levels of energy and engagement
  • Explain and demonstrate how to use breathing to calm anxiety and the nervous system, or to increase focus and energy levels
  • Recite at least two special considerations when engaging someone new in yoga
  • Ensure you know how to make yoga FUN

Strand B | The Role of Genes in Neuropsychiatric Disorders
Jarrett Barnhill, MD, DFAPA, FAACAP, Medical Director, Center for START Services

The role of genetics in our understanding of both neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders is expanding rapidly.  Many of these new discoveries are changing not only our models of how genes work; pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, but also provide new ideas about the metabolism and activity of psychotropic medications (pharmacogenomics).  This presentation will include a brief update on Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome) and Tuberous sclerosis complex.  These syndromes are examples of how genes influence complex neuropsychiatric disorders like ASD and Schizophrenia.  The relationships may require a new look at the biopsychosocial model. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of what genes are, how they influence brain development and the development of primary neuropsychiatric disorders
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of why disorders like Tuberous sclerosis complex and velocardiofacial syndrome are exciting to geneticists and clinicians
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of gene testing in the prescribing and monitoring of psychotropic medication

Strand C | Application of Cultural and Linguistic Competency to START Practices (Part 2)
Joan Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services; Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire; Respondent: Tawara D. Goode, MA, Director, National Center for Cultural Competence, Director, University Center for  Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University  Medical Center

Following Part 1 presented by Tawara Goode, this session will focus on how to incorporate the promotion of cultural and linguistic competency into START’s strength-based leadership practices. Data with regard to race and other issues will be presented. In addition, strength based solutions to address problems associated with bad reputations, diagnostic overshadowing, and “isms” will be discussed.  This is a 2 part series geared toward program leadership. Registration for both sessions is required. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the role of cultural and linguistic competency in START practices
  • Apply positive psychology and strength based approaches within leadership approaches
  • Discuss informal leadership practices to promote positive change

Strand D | START: A Cornerstone for Supporting NC Kids with Complex Needs
Corye Dunn, JD, Director of Public Policy at Disability Rights North Carolina

In 2017 North Carolina expanded START to serve children as a result of a settlement between NC Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and Disability Rights, NC, the state’s Protection & Advocacy agency. This presentation will outline how NC got there, why START was so central to resolving the problems, and what would be done differently in hindsight. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify what problems NC sought to address through START
  • Identify stakeholders for expanding START to serve kids
  • Describe anticipated barriers to expanding START to serve kids

Strand E | Collaborating with Police and the Emergency Department
Bruce Davis, PhD, BCBA-D, Sr. LPE, LPC, Director of Behavioral and Psychological Services, State of Tennessee, Assistant Professor, Lipscomb University; Kelly Land, BSW, Clinical Team Lead, TX Tarrant County START; Hannah Bednar, LMSW, Crisis Intervention Specialist, TX Tarrant County START; Howard Zlamal, MEd,  Special Education Teacher, Sunnyside Unified School District

This presentation aims to discuss the presenters’ engagement with police departments and emergency responders. The presentation will cover aspects of the presenters’ interactions from initial engagement, to training curriculum development and making the content relevant for first responders. This will be an interactive discussion in which attendees will obtain useful information and tools which can be utilized for first responder engagement in their respective communities. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Discuss and identify strategies for engaging with police departments to provide training and education opportunities to increase their effectiveness in interacting with individuals with IDD
  • Identify critical knowledge, skills and abilities for officers and first responders to utilize when responding to calls involving people with IDD
  • Define strategies for training police officers and first responders that promote a positive attitude toward people with disabilities
  • Describe intervention strategies that increase the likelihood of positive outcomes for interactions between persons with IDD and police officers and first responders

Tuesday, May 8

9:00 am – 10:00 am | Research Panel

Strength in Numbers: START Research Initiatives
Joan Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services, Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire; Andrea Caoili, LCSW, Director of Quality Assurance, Center for START Services; Adjunct Professor, College of Health and Human Services, School Of Social Work, University of New Hampshire; Lauren R Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Co-Chair of the START National Research Committee; National Consultant & Trainer, Center for START Services; Luke Kalb, Ph.D, Assistant Professor, Kennedy Krieger Institute; Calliope Holingue, MPH, Post-Doctoral Student, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Ann Klein, MS, SIRS Manager, Center for START Services

The use of the START Information Reporting System (SIRS), a national database, has allowed for ongoing analysis of clinical and service trends for individuals enrolled in START services across the country. This presentation will include a description of the SIRS database, a review of research and development in the work of START and its national network. A summary of findings over the last year will be provided. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Explain the importance and use of data reporting and analysis in the field of MH/IDD
  • Discuss ways data analysis can be used to design, implement and evaluate best practices
  • Demonstrate how the current research related to the START model applies to the field of IDD and co-occurring behavioral and mental health conditions

10:45 am – 12:15 pm | Breakout Session 3

Strand A | Positive Psychotherapy: Cultivating Hope Through Strength-Based Practices
Dan Tomasulo, PhD, MFA, MAPP, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education, Columbia University, Teachers College; Assistant Instructor for Martin Seligman, Masters of Applied Positive Psychology, University of Pennsylvania; Andrea Szucs, LCSW, RDT, AHRC of New York City

The new science of positive psychology seeks to move toward happiness and well-being, not simply away from suffering. We are shifting focus from what’s wrong to what’s strong. A positive outlook on life has been shown to help you live longer, with a stronger immune system, fewer symptoms of depression, higher well-being, greater productivity and better resilience and coping skills during difficult times: This evidence-based workshop looks at the theory, research, and applied aspects of positivity with the goal of helping mental health providers and caregivers use strength-based treatment interventions that nurture themselves and those they work with. This is an experiential workshop employing the best of positive psychology research with various methods of psychotherapy. It is aimed at enhancing a therapist’s skill set to improve their success not only those they work with, but also their own well-being. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the development of the 5 areas of PERMA model by Martin Seligman (Positive emotions, Engagement, Relationship, Meaning, Achievement)
  • Be able to utilize a variety of evidence-based interventions to improve human flourishing, resilience, and positivity in themselves and others
  • Describe the fundamental use of character strengths as an untapped driver of achievement and well-being

Strand B | Providing Integrated Health Support to Children with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities
Gary Maslow, MD, MPH, Primary Care Pediatrician and Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Duke University; Co-Chief of the Division of Child and Family Mental Health; Fellowship Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship; Jillaine VanEssen Baker, MSW LCSW,MTS, Program Director, NC START Central Director, Easter Seals UCP; Duke Chapel Pathways Program Coordinator, Duke University; Karen Luken, MS, Consultant, Easter Seals UCP NC and VA, The Arc of NC and Autism Society of NC

An estimated 1 in 5 children in the United States meet criteria for a diagnosable mental disorder, yet fewer than 20% receive mental health services. Many families indicate that they would prefer to receive mental health services in the child’s medical home as their primary care provider has cared for the child and family during times of good health and illness and knows the family’s strengths and needs. However, many primary care providers have limited knowledge and confidence in how to best treat children’s mental health, behavioral issues and complex health conditions. This session will explore models, frameworks, best practices, and resources for providing health supports to children with disabilities with a focus on pediatric integrated care, developmentally appropriate wellness promotion and proactive crisis prevention. Health care reform offers us the opportunity for innovation that can meet the needs of children and their families during childhood, adolescence and the transition to adulthood. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify a minimum of 2 evidence based models that promote the integration of pediatric, behavioral health and specialized medical services
  • Identify a minimum of 3 resources that START teams and partners can use to provide health supports to children with disabilities
  • Identify a minimum of 2 positive outcomes that can be achieved through an integrated care approach

Strand C | Integrating Wellness and Crisis Prevention in School-wide Frameworks: Insights and Applications for Multi-tiered System of Support (MTSS)
Michael C. McSheehan, Coordinator of Technical Assistance, SWIFT, Institute on Disability/UCED, University of New Hampshire; Project Director, Institute on Disability/UCED University of New Hampshire

In this session we will explore insights and applications for integrating wellness and crisis prevention in school-wide frameworks based on the work of a national technical assistance center, School-wide Integrated Frameworks for Transformation (SWIFT) Education Center. With MTSS gaining traction in states’ ESSA Plans and in LEA’s improvement plans, and with research and practice guidelines supporting integration of mental health with MTSS frameworks, participants in this session will consider ways to leverage the context of MTSS for implementation in schools – and the broader education system. Through video, real-state and school examples, and participant reflections we will move these concepts toward practical application to benefit all students. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe 2 federal policies and 3 historical changes in education that set the context for and interest in MTSS
  • Describe 4 elements of MTSS that reflect the concepts of “comprehensive” and “integrated”
  • Identify at least 3 strategies to integrate wellness and crisis prevention activities in the education system through MTSS

Strand D | Breaking Through Barriers for START Sustainability
Karen L. Weigle, PhD, Associate Director, Center for START Services; Kate Bishop, MPA, Director of Health and Community Living in the Division of Person Centered Supports, Office for People With Developmental Disabilities; Luke Reynard, MBA, Chief Officer of Disability Services, MHMR of Tarrant County; Jill Hinton, PhD, Clinical Director, Center for START Services

In this presentation, you will learn about common barriers and solutions for START program sustainability. An overview of how different programs have been initiated will be presented, along with changes that occur with regard to funding programs over time. START national data that supports sustainability and the evidence-base of the model will be outlined, and leaders of different START teams will share their strategies for sustainability. Finally, future directions for START sustainability will be described. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe common barriers to funding sustainability for START programs
  • Cite/explain data on outcomes that address those barriers
  • Discuss possible solutions for your program based on strategies discussed and START’s ongoing future plan

Strand E | Trauma-Focused Crisis Response
Karyn Harvey, PhD, Licensed Psychologist, Assistant Executive Director of Clinical Supports, Arc of Baltimore

This presentation will explore the causes and biology of trauma and its effects will be discussed.  The profile of many individuals with IDD who have experienced trauma will be introduced. Next, the key factors to crisis response will be explored. Finally, support and follow up for individuals and their systems of care will be explored. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the traumatic stress response and function of the amygdala
  • Identify the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system functions in response to traumatic experiences
  • List the 3 key ingredients in trauma focused crisis intervention that can be used in  practice when working with individuals with IDD

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm | Breakout Session 4

Strand A | Expressive Approaches to Promoting Well-Being
Jennifer Moore, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Central Arkansas; Corey Fisk, MA, R-DMT, L-CAT Limited Permit,  Therapeutic Coaching Team Lead, NY START Region 4 Richmond-Kings; Maggie Robbins, MA, LCAT, RDT, Clinical Team Lead, NC START Central

Participation and engagement in the expressive arts is linked to health, well-being, and quality of life among individuals with disabilities. Expressive arts programs and professionals are available in most communities around the country, making it feasible for organizations who serve individuals with disabilities to utilize these programs. While the information provided during this session showcases how expressive approaches are consistent with the principles of START, all attendees desiring to utilize these approaches in their own practice will benefit from the material presented. Participants in this session will gain an appreciation of the benefits associated with the expressive arts and will leave with knowledge and resources; providing those they serve the opportunity to participate in such valuable programming. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the expressive arts can be used as therapeutic media in a variety of service settings
  • Demonstrate the therapeutic process through active participation in a selection of expressive arts activities
  • Describe the efficacy of utilizing the expressive arts with individuals diagnosed with IDD and behavioral health needs in practice

Strand B | Substance Use Disorders and Impact on Individuals with IDD
Leslie Smith, MD, Medical Director, ArkSTART, Executive Director and Medical Director of the GAIN Inc.

This presentation will examine the impact of substance use and access to treatment for individuals with intellectual disabilities and behavioral health needs. Less than 12% of individuals with IDD who need treatment actually receive services for substance use disorders. Substance use treatment includes 4 stages: engagement, persuasion, active treatment and relapse prevention. An examination of systems of care and how to ensure individuals with IDD who are in need get access to quality, comprehensive services will occur in this presentation. APA Skill Level: Intermediate. APA CE credits offered: 1.5. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the impact of substance use disorders on individuals with IDD and behavioral health needs
  • Describe evidence based interventions that can positively impact engagement in treatment and active avoidance of substances negatively impacting individual outcomes.
  • Identify the multifaceted components of comprehensive treatment for substance use disorders.

Strand C | Assistive Technology for Adults and Children with Autism
Therese Willkomm, PhD, ATP, Director, NH-Assistive Technology State Program, Institute on Disability, University of New Hampshire; Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of New Hampshire

The session will discuss and demonstrate over 50 different assistive technology devices, apps, and adaptations that can be used by individuals who experience autism or other intellectual/developmental disabilities.  The primary focus will be to explore assistive technology solutions that can be used to enhance communication, reading and writing, self-regulation, executive function and improve the well-being of individuals with autism and other disabilities. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how assistive technology can improve the overall wellbeing and behavioral health of individuals with autism and other intellectual/developmental disabilities
  • Identify at least 5 different iPad apps that can be used for communication, reading and writing
  • Identify at least five different mounting and holding and carrying strategies to enhance communication
  • Identify at least five different apps to support executive function and self-regulation

Strand D | Professional Learning Communities: Systems Change through Collaborative Learning
Karen L. Weigle, PhD, Associate Director, Center for START Services; Jill Hinton, PhD, Clinical Director, Center for START Services

This session will describe the background of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) and how START has incorporated this practice into the service array as a method for building community capacity, affecting positive, comprehensive system change. Presenters and participants will discuss the impact of being an active learner in a PLC and how this has impacted practice in the field of IDD and behavioral health. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the research basis for PLCs as a best practice for community based learning
  • Explain the role of PLCs within a START network
  • Describe how participation in a PLC can change practice and build community capacity

Strand E | Facilitating Effective Psychiatric Inpatient Admission, Treatment and Discharge for Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Roberto Blanco, MD, Medical Director, NC START Central, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, UNC School of Medicine; Anne LaForce, MA, LPA, Clinical Director, NC START Central

Psychiatric hospitalization for children with IDD is both common and challenging.  Due to the limited number of specialized units these children are often admitted to general child psychiatric units.  While these units may not be ideal for this population there are times when complex needs make inpatient care appropriate and necessary.  It’s our role as members of the network of support to provide resources and collaboration to assess for appropriate care, help with treatment planning and successful transition back home for these children. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the factors that should be considered in determining whether psychiatric inpatient care is appropriate for children for IDD
  • Identify what treatment strategies are available and possible in a child psychiatric inpatient setting compared to resources and strategies available in community outpatient settings
  • Explain START’s role in assessment, support and discharge/transition planning for children and their systems of support

Wednesday, May 9

9:00 am - 10:00 am | Keynote

Promoting Optimal Physical, Emotional and Social Well-Being for People with IDD
I Leslie Rubin, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics at Morehouse School of Medicine, Medical Director of Developmental Pediatric Specialists, Co-director, Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Unit at Emory University, President and Founder, Break the Cycle of Health Disparities, Inc.

This presentation will review the history of health care delivery for people with IDD and explore strategies to improve health and well-being and prevent medical and psychiatric complications. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the history of health care delivery for people with IDD
  • Recognize the common health care needs of people with IDD
  • Identify health care providers and health care delivery systems to meet the health care needs of people with IDD
  • Negotiate strategies to promote health and prevent medical and psychiatric complications for people with IDD

10:15 am - 11:45 am | Panel

The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of its Parts: Benefits of a Multidisciplinary Approach
I Leslie Rubin, MD; Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics at Morehouse School of Medicine, Medical Director of Developmental Pediatric Specialists, Co-director, Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Unit at Emory University, President and Founder, Break the Cycle of Health Disparities, Inc.; Lauren R Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Co-Chair of the START National Research Committee; National Consultant & Trainer, Center for START Services; Jennifer L McLaren, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center; Medical Director, NH START; Jonathan D. Lichtenstein, PsyD, MBA, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and The Dartmouth Institute, Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, and Director, Pediatric Neuropsychological Services, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; Lisa Plotnik, MD, Internal Medicine-Pediatrics, Dartmouth-Hitchcock

The multidisciplinary panel of experts will be demonstrating and discussing the benefits of multidisciplinary evaluation in the assessment of children with IDD who have significant behavioral health challenges. To illustrate the importance of a true bio-psycho-social framework, an example case will be reviewed. APA Skill Level: Introductory. APA CE credits offered: 1.5. Dartmouth-Hitchcock designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. 

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least 2 major benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to assessment of children with IDD who also have significant behavioral health needs and why the whole is greater than the sum of the parts
  • Describe 3 medical problems that commonly contribute to altered mood and behavior in children with IDD who present for a psychiatric assessment
  • Describe 3 ways in which co-occurrence of seizure disorders impact mental health and behavioral concerns of children with IDD
  • Describe 3 common contextual influences on the occurrence of mood and behavioral challenges of children with IDD