2020 SNTI Program Details

2020 Theme | START With Mindfulness: Unlocking Our Potential

2020 Breakout Content Strands

  • Strength-Based Approaches & Community Inclusion

  • Psychiatry & Integrated Health

  • Research, Policy & Practices

  • Cross-Systems Crisis Intervention

 

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Monday May 4th

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM | Keynote

Mindfulness for Individuals with IDD and Mental Health Needs
Nirbhay Singh, PhD, BCBA-D, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University

This opening keynote will introduce mindfulness as a simple practice that makes a small cognitive shift of the mind through meditation, which results in large positive changes in our lives. It will briefly cover the basics of mindfulness meditation and how it changes our brain and behavior through the mind-body connection. A central focus will be on how mindfulness has been used in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities, and how parents, teachers, paid caregivers and people with IDD can use it to improve their mental health (e.g., stress, anxiety, worry, burnout), as well as have better control of behavioral excesses (e.g., anger, aggression, disruptive, and destructive behaviors). The talk will be based on most current research findings and emphasize the practical relevance of mindfulness in our daily lives.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define mindfulness meditation in terms of attention, awareness, and acceptance
  • Practice focused meditation
  • Enumerate mindfulness programs for caregivers and informal practices that can be used by people with IDD

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM | Keynote

Learned Hopefulness
Dan Tomasulo, PhD, TEP, MFA, MAPP, Core Faculty, Spirituality Mind Body Institute, Teachers College, Columbia University, Assistant Instructor, Masters of Applied Positive Psychology Program, University of Pennsylvania

Until recently hope has not been explored as a state or trait that can be cultivated. New research has revealed there are several cognitive and emotional processes that are able to be acquired. This presentation will give an overview of Learned Hopefulness research and the activities which facilitate its development.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define the concept of Learned Hopefulness
  • Describe the 7 decisions that limit or facilitate hope
  • Explain the Hierarchy of Hope

11:15 AM - 12:30 PM | Panel

START to Finish: Multidisciplinary Assessment
Lauren Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Consultant, Center for START Services, YAI, Jarrett Barnhill, MD, Professor Emeritus, UNH School of Medicine, Jennifer McLaren, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at The Dartmouth Institute, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Leslie Rubin, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine, Angela Hassiotis, MD, PhD, FRCPsych, Professor Of Psychiatry Intellectual Disabilities, UCL Division Of Psychiatry

What approaches are needed when a person with IDD is referred for assessment when they have received a lot of care for their challenges and alterations in mood and behavior, but they are still struggling; even doing worse than ever? What if we more or less need to "START Over" to figure out what factors are causing distress or preventing wellness? How do we ensure we are covering all the bases, doing a true developmental-bio-psycho-social examination of the difficulties faced by someone we are trying to help? Best Practices say we need a Multidisciplinary Evaluation when individual's challenges persist. In this panel, we will present the basics to a comprehensive or integrated healthcare look at common presenting concerns of the people we serve.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List several factors that may influence a person with IDD having persistent challenges or emotional distress demonstrated by alterations in mental status, mood or behavior
  • Describe the most common psychiatric diagnostic errors when people with IDD appear to have the wrong diagnosis
  • Name several common medical problems that can provoke a clinical picture in people with IDD that may mimic an acute psychiatric syndrome, or appear like a “behavior problem”
  • List at least two neurological problems that get missed, and have influence on mood and behavior

1:45 PM - 3:15 PM | Breakout Session 1

Strand A | Mindfulness & Yoga: Awareness Through Movement
Lisa Wilhelmy, MA, Senior START Instructor, NYSTART Region 5 FREE, Keith Beasley, Yoga Instructor, Yoga Alliance

Yoga and mindfulness have been proven to be effective interventions to improve overall mental and physical well-being (Davis & Hayes, 2011; Woodyard, 2011). This presentation aims to provide participants with the knowledge and skills needed to implement basic mindfulness and yogic techniques both personally and in the support of individuals with MH/IDD.

This presentation will consist of two 45-minute modules:

  • Mindfulness: As individuals, and as a group, interactively utilize yogic techniques to promote awareness, connect the mind with body and promote spinal wellness. The mindfulness module will demonstrate use of guided meditation, breathing exercises, body scan and visualization, encouraging mindfulness and relaxation. Participants will also explore music as a means to promote mindful movement. Engage in standing and seated movements for daily, functional mobility, spinal wellness and range of motion.
  • Adaptive yoga: The learner will demonstrate and practice simple yogic technique, engaging as individuals and within small groups. Techniques reviewed are accessible physical techniques, emphasizing breath awareness, spinal wellness, and effect of spinal flexibility on the nervous system, including: back bends/ chest openers and forward bends for calming. The learner will analyze environmental advantages and assess solutions surrounding limitations. Practice use of props to create a more accessible means to encourage safe alignment and connection to the breath.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain and demonstrate (2) accessible and adaptive yoga techniques to (with practice) support mindfulness and strengthen coping capacity
  • Utilize (2) simple props to support spinal wellness, physical alignment and connection to the breath (ex: wall space, chair, blanket/ strap/ towel, bolster/ pillow, block)
  • Identify (1) practical application of simple technique in professional or personal setting
  • Explain the evidence-based reasons why mindfulness and yogic techniques benefit a person both mentally and physically

Strand B | Positive Medicine and Its Impact on Health Practices
Dan Tomasulo, PhD, TEP, MFA, MAPP, Core Faculty, Spirituality Mind Body Institute, Teachers College, Columbia University, Assistant Instructor, Masters of Applied Positive Psychology Program, University of Pennsylvania, Leslie Rubin, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine

Positive Medicine is an approach to burnout for physicians that helps them develop skills of resilience by cultivating well-being.  It utilizes scientifically validated assessments and physiologic measures of well-being to create objective and meaningful change in physician’s lives. This evidence based program introduces the science of positive psychology.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how Seligman’s PERMA model of well-being has been extended
  • Describe the caregiver’s fatigue syndrome and how this impacts physicians
  • Describe how hope impacts the delivery of psychotherapy services

Strand C | Lessons Learned from National Research Consortium in MHIDD
Luther G. Kalb, PhD, Assistant Professor, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Chair, National Research Consortium on MHIDD, Co-Chair, START Research Committee, Matthew Wappett, PhD, Exec Director & Research Associate Prof, Utah State University, Center for Disability Studies, Melanie Hecker, Advocate/Student/Inspirational Speaker, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy at the University of Albany, Youth Power! New York

The National Research Consortium (NRC) is a national group comprised of researchers and stakeholders invested in improving the health and wellbeing of those with Intellectual and Developmental Disorders and co-occurring mental health needs (MHIDD).  Our objective is to foster ongoing collaboration between highly experienced and early-career scientists, providers, family members, and individuals with lived experiences, resulting in an expansion and dissemination of knowledge and research in the field. This presentation will provide an overview of NRC, its current research, policy priorities, and projects.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define the goals of the National Research Consortium in MHIDD
  • Describe the role of stakeholders from diverse backgrounds in meeting the consortium mission
  • List the priorities and projects of the NRC

Strand D | Trauma-Informed Strategies For Mobile Crisis And First Responders
Karen L. Weigle, PhD, Associate Director, Center for START Services , Jill Hinton, PhD, Clinical Director, Center for START Services , and Anne LaForce, MA, LPA, Director of Therapeutic Coaching, Center for START Services

In this presentation participants will learn trauma-informed strategies to use in crisis response as well as to teach other first responders in the field. The neurobiology of trauma will be described, and simple strategies will be taught and practiced.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the neurobiology of trauma
  • Identify the emotional/behavioral presentation of a trauma response
  • Demonstrate use of several trauma-informed strategies aimed at stabilizing crisis situations

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM | Breakout Session 2

Strand A | Building Resilience Through Trauma-Informed Creative Expression
Anne LaForce, MA, LPA, Director of Therapeutic Coaching, Center for START Services and Corey Fisk, MA, L-CAT, R-DMT, Assistant Director of Therapeutic Supports, NYSTART Region 4 Richmond-Kings

In this presentation participants will learn trauma-informed strategies based on the Expressive Therapy Continuum to support people who have experienced trauma and to build resiliency. This presentation will provide information on how trauma impacts brain function and the importance of understanding the bottom – up approach in developing creative and strength-based strategies to guide individuals towards post-traumatic growth.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the impact of trauma on the brain
  • Describe the importance of positive strategies in building post- traumatic resilience and growth
  • Demonstrate use of creative activities based on the Expressive Therapy Continuum (ETC) and bottom-up trauma informed strategies

Strand B | ADHD and IDD: The common comorbidity
Jennifer McLaren, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at The Dartmouth Institute, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Roberto Blanco, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, UNC School of Medicine, Jim Bedford, MD, Assistant Professor, UNC School of Medicine

ADHD in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities is highly prevalent and causes notable functional impairment. Individuals with comorbid ADHD and IDD may be misdiagnosed and/or over-treated. In this presentation the prevalence, etiologic factors, assessment, diagnostic issues, and functional consequences of ADHD in individuals with IDD will be reviewed. Treatment options for ADHD in individuals with IDD will be discussed including the evidence-base for psychopharmacologic treatment and non-psychopharmacologic interventions.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe prevalence, etiologic factors, assessment, diagnostic issues, and functional consequences of ADHD in individuals with IDD
  • Review psychopharmacologic treatment options for ADHD in individuals with IDD
  • Discuss non-psychopharmacologic treatment options for  ADHD in individuals with intellectual disability

Strand C | It Begins with Listening: Avoiding Assumptions & Finding Opportunities
Michael Smull, Senior Partner, Support Development Associates, Mary Lou Bourne, MS, Chief Quality and Innovation Officer, National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services, Russell Lehmann, Autism & Mental Health Speaker, Author, Poet, Advocate

Mindfulness when offering support begins with listening with purposeful intent to understand. When we hear of (or read about) actions a person engages in, and we immediately assign the description of a challenging behavior, it typically results in an associated diagnostic label.  This chain reaction, when documented in a record, often leads the reader to make assumptions about the person that do not reflect who the person really is or how to best support them.  Simply stated, the solution is to listen intently both to the words a person says AND the messages being delivered by their actions.  In this session participants will hear from a person with lived experience and practitioners about the importance of listening with compassion and listening within a framework that starts with understanding what is important to each individual, from their own perspective.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how assumptions influence our understanding of a person’s life experience and may lead to recommendations that limit their potential experiences
  • Describe new frameworks of listening for both what is important to, as well as, what is important for, people
  • List at least three (3) tools for eliciting information and assessing current status of individuals that can facilitate more effective listening and understanding

Strand D | A Nuts And Bolts Approach To Crisis Intervention: Practical Mindfulness Strategies For The Responding Clinician
Andrea Caoili, LCSW, Director of Research & Quality Assurance, Center for START Services, Adjunct Professor, University of New Hampshire College of Health and Human Services, David O'Neal, MS, LMHC, MPH, Project Facilitator, Center for START Services, Director of IDD Services, Sound Health , Dan Baker, PhD, NADD-CC, Positive Support Compliance Specialist, Minnesota Department of Human Services

In this presentation, practical trauma-focused strategies for stress reduction will be provided that can be used before, during and after a crisis event. Self-awareness, prevention of compassion fatigue and “mindful intervention” on the part of the clinician are crucial elements of a comprehensive crisis intervention approach. Proactive crisis intervention and stress management strategies that can be used by clinicians to promote the mental wellness of individuals they serve with MH/IDD and their care providers. These strategies are built on mindfulness principles including grounding and relaxation and can be used by all involved, including the clinician themselves.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least three (3) relaxation strategies that can be used to intervene in a crisis situation
  • List at least three (3) strategies professionals can use to avoid compassion fatigue
  • Describe at least three (3) examples of mindful crisis intervention assessment and intervention strategies

5:15 PM - 6:30 PM | Research Poster Session & Professional Networking Event

This event provides SNTI attendees with the opportunity to review research posters from START programs and partners from across the country while networking with colleagues. Posters will be judged, and award recipients will be announced at the Awards Luncheon on Tuesday.

Tuesday May 5th

7:00 AM - 8:15 AM | START Breakfast Sessions

  • Session 1: START Program Sustainability
  • Session 2: Strength-Spotting
  • Session 3: START Overview
  • Session 4: Health & Wellbeing for Practitioners

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM | Keynote

The State of START
Joan B. Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services, Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire College of Health and Human Services

9:30 AM - 11:00 AM | Panel

CSS Research Initiatives: Promoting Best Practices With Emphasis On Mental Wellness
Joan B. Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services, Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire College of Health and Human Services, Andrea Caoili, LCSW, Director of Research & Quality Assurance, Center for START Services, Adjunct Professor, University of New Hampshire College of Health and Human Services, Luther G. Kalb, PhD, Assistant Professor, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Chair, National Research Consortium on MHIDD, Co-Chair, START Research Committee, Ann Klein, MA, Director of Evaluation and Outcomes, The Center for START Service,  Jessica Kramer, PhD, OTR/L, Associate Professor, Department of OT, University of Florida

Research and evaluation in MHIDD and START practices continues to be an area of focus of the Center for START Services. This presentation will include a discussion about research efforts in positive mental wellness, as well as partnerships and linkages developed throughout the year, including the launch of the National Research Consortium in MHIDD. The START Information Reporting System (SIRS), a national database, has grown and allows for more wellness-focused evaluation. A summary of research efforts and finding over the last year will be provided. This presentation is intended for all professionals working in the MH/IDD field including family caregivers and individuals with lived experience. 

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify gaps in research in MHIDD, especially in the areas of wellness and positive mental health
  • Discuss the value of community partnerships and linkages in advancing innovative research and evaluation
  • Describe CSS’s research efforts in positive mental wellness and plans for the future

11:15 AM - 12:30 PM | Breakout Session 3

Strand A | Fighting for Your Child’s Life: A Lifelong Journey
Joan B. Beasley, PhD, Director, Center for START Services, Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire College of Health and Human Services, Susan Klick, Parent/Family Member, Member of the START National Advisory Council and National Research Consortium on MHIDD, Ron & Leila Roberts, My Health My Resources of Tarrant County, Stephanie Morris, Parent & Family Advocate, My Health My Resources of Tarrant County

START Value #1: Service recipients and their families are our most valued partners. This interactive presentation will highlight family and caregiver experiences through an exploration of facts versus myths. Each myth will be discussed and dispelled using evidence from research studies with the goal of promoting inclusion and belonging through humility, curiosity and active inquiry. Panelists will also share resources and toolkits that offer strategies aimed at more inclusive practices.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List at least three (3) common myths about family members and/or individuals with MH/IDD and cite the evidence-based facts that dispel them
  • Describe the importance of collaboration with an individual’s family members/caregivers as valued members of the system of support
  • Utilize resources provided to improve inclusion of families/caregivers within their own systems of support  

Strand B | The Cost of Doing Business: Adverse Drug Events and Drug Induced Movement Disorders
Lauren Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Consultant, Center for START Services, YAI, Sherm Fox, MD, Medical Director of the Sovner Center, Bridgewell, START National Team Member, and Leslie Smith, MD

In this talk, the nature of common and some rare adverse drug events associated with use of psychotropics will be reviewed, with an emphasis on movement disorders provoked by antipsychotic medications. Case examples and video clips will be used to increase participants’ ability to recognize these phenomena. How side effects associated distress can inadvertently lead to polypharmacy will also be addressed.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List the most common side effects described in studies using psychotropics in samples including people with IDD
  • Describe features of at least 3 forms of antipsychotic drug related movement disorders
  • Describe features seen in neuroleptic malignant syndrome

Strand C | Violence and Mental Illness: The Real Story
Jill Hinton, PhD, Clinical Director, Center for START Services

The events of violence and hate that have occurred in our country are tragic and communities have been traumatized. The ripple effects of these acts are felt throughout communities across our country as we try to find ways to respond to the hate that has permeated our country. One unfounded response that has emerged is to blame the violence on mental illness. Routinely blaming mass shootings on mental illness is simplistic and inaccurate, and further stigmatizes an already stigmatized group. Stigma has arisen out of fear and a lack of understanding. This presentation will describe the history of stigma and how it has led to the myths that are influencing public discourse and public policy.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Examine historical factors that impact perceptions of violence in people with disabilities
  • Describe why language and definitions matter
  • Identify and dispel the myths around violence and mental illness
  • Discuss steps to educate the public and policy makers

Strand D | Partnering with Law Enforcement: Working Our Way Up the Triangle
David O'Neal, MS, LMHC, MPH, Project Facilitator, Center for START Services, Director of IDD Services, Sound Health, and Tiffany Liska, MA, Clinical Team Lead, Iowa START

When working with any system partner, the relationship must encompass multiple ways of interacting together. With first responders and law enforcement, it is important to provide resources and services at the tertiary, secondary, and primary levels of intervention...Often all at the same time! This presentation will provide theory, methods, models, and actual partnerships demonstrated at each level.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least one (1) intervention at each level of the tertiary care model (primary, secondary, tertiary) that improves interactions with law enforcement at the point of crisis response
  • Identify at least two (2) tools that can be used to increase capacity for knowledge, identification, and understanding of MH/IDD amongst law enforcement
  • Describe the most common ways individuals with IDD come into contact with law enforcement

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM | START Awards Luncheon

The Awards Luncheon provides an opportunity to recognize members of the START Network for their exceptional leadership and significant contributions to improving service outcomes and enhancing systemic capacity. The Center for START Services will present awards to START Team Members, network partners, care coordinators and nationally recognized special guests as we enjoy a delicious lunch together.

2:15 PM - 3:45 PM | Breakout Session 4

Strand A | Practical Applications of Mindfulness-Based Programs for Children
Nirbhay Singh, PhD, BCBA-D, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University

This session will focus on (a) practical applications of mindfulness-based programs for children and (b) specific mindfulness meditations that can be taught to children at various developmental levels. The presentation will cover what we know about the evidence-base for the effects of mindfulness-based programs on children and adolescents, and the specific programs used to produce these effects. There will be an opportunity for the attendees to sample some of these meditation practices during the presentation and subsequently use them with children and adolescents.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List mindfulness-based practices for children and adolescents
  • Demonstrate at least one mindfulness-based meditation often used with children
  • Enumerate mindfulness-based programs that have been found effective with children and adolescents and to list their specific effects

Strand B | Integrated Care Of A Person With Intellectual Disabilities In Mental Health Crisis
Lauren Charlot, PhD, LICSW, Consultant, Center for START Services, YAI and Angela Hassiotis, MD, PhD, FRCPsych, Professor Of Psychiatry Intellectual Disabilities, UCL Division Of Psychiatry

The presentation will cover the interface between health professionals in assessing and managing a mental health crisis in a person with intellectual disabilities. The presentation will outline the elements of integrated care, the challenges that may be encountered and will provide examples of how to overcome them. The emphasis will be on the promotion of a strength based approach and for non inpatient care depending on presentation and other individual and systemic factors. examples from the UK and the US will be used to illustrate practice elements and to foster an interactive learning session.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define integrated care and list its components
  • Identify aspects of good practice in the management of a mental health crisis in a person with intellectual disability
  • Describe your approach to implementing a strength based approach to managing a mental health crisis in a person with intellectual disability

Strand C | Integrated MH/IDD Policy: A Panel Discussion
Mary Lou Bourne, MS, Chief Quality and Innovation Officer, National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services, Josh Berezin, MD, Clinical Director, New York State Office of Mental Health; New York City Field Office, Bob Lincoln, MBA, LMSW, CEO , County Social Services Mental Health & Disability Services Region, Patricia Nobbie, PhD, Director Disability Policy Engagement, Anthem, Inc, Susan Klick, Parent/Family Member, Member of the START National Advisory Council and National Research Consortium on MHIDD, Colleen Horton, MPA, Director of Policy, Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, The University of Texas at Austin, Mya Lewis, MA, IDD & TBI Section Chief, NC Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services

START works to bring systems together in order to more effectively and efficiently support individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health needs (MH/IDD). This panel brings experience and perspective regarding local, state and federal policy and initiatives that impact this work.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how state and federal policies impact services and supports delivered to individuals with MH/IDD
  • Describe current promising practices and policies that support the integration of IDD and MH services and supports
  • Identify practices and policies that will move systems toward true integration

Strand D | START Crisis Response
Andrea Caoili, LCSW, Director of Research & Quality Assurance, Center for START Services, Adjunct Professor, University of New Hampshire College of Health and Human Services, Luther G. Kalb, PhD, Assistant Professor, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Chair, National Research Consortium on MHIDD, Co-Chair, START Research Committee, Jillaine Baker, LCSW, Consultant, Center for START Services

The primary reasons for referral to START programs nationally are aggression, mental health concerns for the person and risk of crisis. START programs provide 24-hour crisis response to all enrollees, including on-site response, de-escalation, assessment and disposition planning. This presentation will provide START crisis response trends across the country, characterizing the nature, type, and predictors of these contacts. Outcomes and implications from the analysis will be discussed and case examples will be provided.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the types of START crisis response
  • Identify trends in crisis response for START enrollees including adults and children
  • Discuss policy and practice implications across the MHIDD field

4:15 PM - 5:45 PM | START Film Premiere & Panel Discussion

Join filmmaker Dan Habib for the premiere of the START film. This film focuses on the groundbreaking practices and philosophies of the START model and the impact START has on the lives of the many people and families it serves across the country. A facilitated panel discussion will follow the premiere of the film which will include individuals and family member featured in the film as well as the START team members involved in the film's production.

Wednesday May 6th

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM | Practice Group Breakout Sessions

  • Clinical Directors
  • Medical Directors
  • Program Directors
  • Resource Center Directors
  • Team Leaders
  • Therapeutic Coaching

9:15 AM - 11:45 AM | Wednesday Keynote & Panel

Part I: Keynote | 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM
Part II: Panel | 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Practicing Mindfulness Requires Us To Confront and Address Our Own Biases
Tawara Goode, MA, Assistant Professor & Director, Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence; Panelists: Russell Lehmann, Autism & Mental Health Speaker, Author, Poet, Advocate, Stephanie Morris, Parent & Family Advocate, My Health My Resources of Tarrant County, Roberto Blanco, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, UNC School of Medicine

There are numerous definitions of and approaches to mindfulness in the scientific, popular, and spiritual literatures. What they all have in common is a person’s capacity to be purposeful, completely engaged in the present moment, and nonjudgmental. Many consider these as essential areas of knowledge and skills for all professions. The emergence of mindfulness as a practice in intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health(IDD-MH) is in its early stages and holds much promise for the field. Practicing mindfulness will require us to accept, confront, and address our own innate human tendency for biases – both at the conscious or explicit and unconscious or implicit levels. This plenary keynote and panel are designed to: 1) take a deep dive into the nature and manifestation of biases; 2) offer first person narratives from those who have perpetrated or experienced biases, and 3) examine what to do to mitigate the effect of biases in the field of IDD-MH.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define explicit and implicit biases
  • Respond to quick quiz self-assessment on biases
  • Describe the effects of explicit and implicit biases in services and supports for individuals with IDD-MH and their families
  • List six interventions to address explicit and implicit biases in IDD-MH services and supports including the role of cultural competence

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Contact Us

If you have any questions, please contact Mary Ann Allsop at (603) 228-2085 ext. 23 or email registration.snti@unh.edu.